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Morse Code Ninja

Practice


Select Speed and Type - Sorted from easier to harder:
 
** Send Practice is below.
 
Speed:
Type:

Playback Options:

1) YouTube:
From the selection above, select only one speed and type, which will cause a YouTube video to be launched in a new browser window. On mobile devices, the practice video will begin in the native YouTube app. (I have set up JavaScript to prevent you from selecting more than one, but it is not perfect on mobile devices.) There are a handful of speed and type combinations that do not exist. It is on my to-do list to create them and post them to YouTube. In the meantime, you will get a warning message saying that it does not exist.

If you have YouTube Premium, you have the added benefit of saving the videos to watch offline. And perhaps more usefully, you can continue to play the video on a mobile device with the screen turned off!

2) Direct Download:
If you would prefer to have audio files to listen to on your device, you may download ZIP files by speed. Each ZIP file is larger than 1GB in size and contains all of the practice sets as MP4/M4A files encoded with AAC. These files will playback on current operating systems and handheld devices. But Android users may need to download a compatible player from the App store. There are several free players available for Android devices.

To get the most value from these files, avoid memorizing the content! To do this, you will want to ensure that you continue playback from where you left off. Some players will automatically do this for you, and others will not. iOS devices will save the position if the file is set up as an audiobook.

Please only download the speeds you intend to use in the immediate future. Every download adds to my hosting costs. I will update the files as new content is added. PayPal donations are appreciated, even $1 is helpful to offset your download.

3) High-fidely MP3 files:
If you would prefer to have 256kbs MP3 files or your device does not support MP4 files, please contact me. I can easily share the files with you through DropBox. Please note that the entire collection is more than 400GB in size! So you will need a paid DropBox account. If you don't have one, you can sign up for a free trial and then cancel within the free trial period. When you contact me, please provide the email address associated with your DropBox account.

4) USB Flash Drive:
If you do not have access to high-speed internet, please contact me to purchase a name brand 256GB flash drive with absolutely everything I have created as MP3 files. There is 3,000+ hours worth of content! It will cost $50, which includes shipping, and will be payable via PayPal. The flash drive will have the MP3s encoded at 128Kbps.

I am currently seeking a retailer to handle the logistics of providing the material on a flash drive and not charge much more above the cost of it.

5) Playback in Other Programs:

You may download the practice sets as text files for use with other programs. These may be of interest if you want to add noise, use a different pitch, or use a different practice technique.

If you wish to use the text files with voiced components, the following code snippet in Perl will be helpful in determing how to quickly parse them.

  cat example-file.txt | perl -e '
  while(<>) {
    my $ending = "=";
    if($_ =~ m/(.*?)\h*\[(.*?)(\|(.*?))?\]\h*\s*([\^|\.|\?])\s*$/) {
        my $sentence_part = $1;
        my $spoken_directive = $2;
        my $repeat_part = $4;
        $sentence_part =~ s/\^|\\//g;
        $spoken_directive =~ s/\^|\\//g;
        $repeat_part =~ s/\^|\\//g;
        print("$sentence_part $ending\n");
    } else {
        my $line = $_;
        chomp($line);
        $line =~ s/\^|\\//g;
        print ("$line $ending \n");
    }
  }'

Background and Usage:

The practice videos are sorted from easiest to hard. For each video, try to head-copy it. First, the word, callsign, or phrase is sent. Then it is spoken. And finally, it is sent again in Morse code. If you missed it the first time, the second time allows you an opportunity to learn it. I find it helpful to speak the word or phrase during the pause.

In terms of practice, it is better to have more frequent and shorter practice sessions over one or two long practice sessions per week. Ideally, practice sessions should be no more than 15 or 20 minutes long, with two to three sessions per day. Each video is long enough that you can keep coming back to it and pick up where you left off. As long as you are logged to YouTube on each device, YouTube will remember your place across browsers and devices. And each video is long enough that you will not exhaust it before progressing to a faster speed or more challenging type of practice.

The practice videos are intended to help you progress from 15wpm Instant Character Recognition to as high as 50wpm sentences. If you need help going from no proficiency with Morse Code to 15wpm Instant Character Recognition, then check out my Morse code course.

If you would like an extra challenge, try keying what you copied before the answer is spoken. This option works well for the shorter practice sets, such as the Single Letter and Single Digit sets. If the delay is a little too short, you may have to send it faster than it is sent to you.

If there is something that you would like to see beyond what I have created, let me know, and I will see what I can do! And if you would like to be notified of additional content, feel free to access my channel and click subscribe!


US States:

The US State abbreviations are a great step to go from copying individual letters to words. The abbreviations contain almost every letter in the alphabet, and there are only 50 states.

Ideally, you will hear the abbreviation in your inner voice as it is spoken as opposed to the abbreviation as a series of characters. Mental translations take time, and it will save you mental effort later on.


Multi-letter Phonemes:

Phonemes are the smallest unit of sounds that distinguish one word from another. One or more characters may represent them, and there are 44 phonemes in the English language. Examples include PH, NG, and TH.

I have created the multi-letter phoneme practice sets to help learn to sound out words as you head-copy words letter-by-letter. As you practice, try to say the sound of the letter(s) in your head as opposed to the individual letters. This approach will help you avoid having a lookup table of letters and sounds. Unfortunately, spelling is complicated, and some letter combinations represent multiple sounds. An example is NG, which is used to represent two different phonemes as in BRING and LOUNGE.


Callsign Prefixes for DXCC Entities:

It can be difficult learning to head copy callsigns. Practicing with callsign prefixes can ease the transition to copying full callsigns and, in my experience, learning the country that the prefix belongs to helps even more. For each callsign prefix, try to head-copy it and determine which country it belongs to.

A special thank you goes to Daniel (KK4FOS) at Buckmaster International for making this possible!

So how did I determine which prefixes to use? First, I identified the common DXCC entities by using the DXCC Most Wanted 2019 list, reversing it, and taking the top 25, 50, and 100 entities. It is a reasonable assumption that the least wanted DXCC entities are the most frequently heard stations on the air.

Next, I needed to determine which prefixes are most commonly issued by the governing body for each DXCC entity. For this, I reached out to Buckmaster International on whether I would be able to download and use their database to determine a list of callsigns issued for a given DXCC entity. The answer was no, but Daniel immediately provided the information I needed to figure this out. Once I had a list, it was a small matter of writing a couple of short Perl and R scripts to parse, filter, count, and combine data to get the most commonly issued prefixes for a given DXCC entity.


Contest Exchanges:

For each contest exchange, I acquired the necessary data to create a practice set that would match the experiences of a North American operator. For example, I used 2019 Field Day Contest results published in QST magazine for the Field Day Contest Exchange.

On the other hand, I treated all possible exchanges as equally probable while creating the encore practice sets. For example, "2B1B NL" is an unlikely Field Day Contest exchange, and yet it had the same probability as being selected as "1D VA," which is one of the more common exchanges. The net effect is that the Encore practice sets are more challenging.


Suffix Practice Sets:

I created several practice sets to help you recognize words that have the common suffixes ES/S, ED, ING, and LY. Practicing these will help you avoid getting tripped up by anticipating the wrong word, such as expecting RUN and getting RUNNING instead.

Each practice set contains the Top 100 words for a given prefix and the corresponding root word, such as FIX and FIXED. The selection of words is randomized, so 50% of the time, you will receive the root word while the other 50% of the time, you will receive the word with the given suffix.

I identified the Top 100 words for a given suffix by processing Google's entire English 1-gram 2012 dataset to yield the top 250,000 words, which is based on their project of scanning millions of books! Once the words were ordered by frequency, I evaluated words with the most common prefixes and suffixes (dis, in, im, il, ir, re, un, ed, ing, ly, s/es) and found that only the suffixes were common enough to merit an entire practice set. For example, the top 100 words with a suffix of ES/S were found within the 112th to 1,085th most frequent words while the top 100 words with a suffix of IBLE were found within the 231st to 61,807th most frequent words. So it may not be worthwhile to focus on the lesser common suffixes and prefixes until mastering a substantial vocabulary.


Sets of Words:

It can be difficult transitioning from copying individual words to entire sentences. I located the most frequent 2, 3, 4, and 5-word combinations in contemporary English. These sentence fragments are known as N-grams and should seem familiar and common to any English speaker. I have selected the top 500 N-grams for each set.

To my knowledge, this is an innovative idea that has not been done before! I have found this particularly helpful in learning to head-copy entire sentences.


Sentences from Top Words:

I have created practice sets based on the Top 100 through 1,400 Words to continue your journey in head-copying sentences. If you know the Top 100 Words and the common punctuations, you are ready to go.

These sentences are of limited complexity and length. The length of each sentence is limited to between 3 and 12 words. And each video contains around 275 unique sentences. Each practice set is designed to teach you 100 new words. Later practice sets may only contain some of the words found in prior practice sets. Each new word typically shows up at least ten times throughout the practice set.


Common QSO Phrases:

I came up with more than 200 phrases and their variations that can be found in a typical QSO. These videos will assist you to go from head-copying individual words and abbreviations to an entire QSO in Morse code.


A Sound of Thunder:

The Sound of Thunder is a science fiction short story by Ray Bradbury. The sentence structure is not too complicated, and he does not use an extensive vocabulary. Both of these qualities make it a good candidate for a story in Morse code.



Send Practice

Driving:

As you travel down the road take note of license plates and signs that contain words. Practice sending them in Morse code out loud or spoken silently in your mind. For example, STOP would be vocalized as di-di-dit   dah   dah-dah-dah   di-dah-dah-dit. See the reference page if you need more details.

 

Common QSO Phrases:

Directions: Send each line correctly. If you make a mistake, start over. Substitute your info in place of mine. If you have a variation that you prefer, use that instead.

CQ CQ de AD0WE AD0WE K
Tnx fer the call
UR RST 599 5nn
Name Kurt Kurt
QTH Manhattan, KS KS
Been a ham since 1996
Rig ICOM7300 es running 10 watts into dipole ant
73 73 tnx fer QSO es gud dx
HW CPY?
Name?
AGN
FB

 

Panograms:

Directions: Ideally, learn to send one or more phrases without reading it as you send it. If you make a mistake, resend the word until you get it correct, and then start over. Continue to send the phrase until you can send it correctly all the way through.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dogs back

Sphinx of black quartz, judge my vow

Pack my box with five dozen liquor jugs

The five boxing wizards jump quickly

Brawny gods just flocked up to quiz and vex him

A quart jar of oil mixed with zinc oxide makes a very bright paint.

Six big juicy steaks sizzled in a pan as five workmen left the quarry.

The July sun caused a fragment of black pine wax to ooze on the velvet quilt.

 

Top 100 Words:

Directions: These words are roughly sorted in order of easiest to hardest. (I found them particularly useful when initially learning to send.) If you make a mistake, resend the word and continue. For an extra challenge, send each line correctly. If you make a mistake start over and send that line of words again.

go am me on by to up so it no of as he if an us or
in is at my we do be and man him out not but can
who has may was one she all you how any its saw
are now two for men her had the our his been some
then like well made when have only your work over
such time were with into very what then more
will they come that from must said them this upon
great about other shall every these first their could
which would there before should little people

 

Dit Warm-up Word/Phrase:

Mississippi

Mississippi sissies are sissier than Tennessee sissies

 

Dit Exercise:

Directions: Send each line correctly. If you make a mistake, start over.

She is him es he is she.
Is she he?
He is she.
Shall his be these?
Did she see his fees?
This is she.
N5SHS is his call.
Is NS5H hers?
Did she see these?
He is in these trees.
His trees are these.
His tree is here.
She es he.
She is 55 es she is his sister.

 

Finger Twisters:

RADIOTELETYPEWRITER

Dells little feet looked different during summer session
classes especially after he fell off the roof in Mississippi
and shattered his goofy little glasses.

 

Musical Word:

GEGEBEN (German word for "given.")

 

Call Signs:

Directions: Send each callsign correctly before moving to the next. If you find it easy, try sending three callsigns in a row correctly, practice at a higher speed, or glance at the callsign and then send it from memory.



You may find it easier to download and print a PDF of the DX tables below.

DX Callsigns 1-30
1.WA0LJJR1KXSSP5ULD
2.UW7XF1UFXEA4ANN
3.K5USIW9LOAB4KN
4.JA3PRMPE1RAJA8AWR
5.RA9UAG4X1HJAG5W
6.ZL2WWN4XRKHA5KDQ
7.KB5DQARA3GFT96J
8.DL7VSNJI2ZMWKI8EK
9.CV9AMRV3DAKWD9FCN
10.W0SEIR1ANN7S5LH

DX Callsigns 31-60
11.DL1DUOKB7NUR5GMK
12.JA8KSWW8ZJYK4HFQ
13.KV8QGW4CQZEA2EC
14.FO8DXN2JJFN7RX
15.N5ZKHB9DEQON7AR
16.VK6WRRA3DEQPY7AR
17.LY2BAWOL8RAC7IU
18.RA6AAWN5TSLS53F
19.DL3AMBSP2ZIEK2ARB
20.DL2AMIVE6ETTNZ1R

DX Callsigns 61-90
21.UU5AJH8XTVPU5HAS
22.EA4BFWA2ELWG4WGE
23.MM0DHQN8FLZUA2AW
24.W2JLKDM2CHKJA2KPW
25.ND4AASP9LWJA2KG
26.G5XN5KROH8HAR
27.T91ENVDH1ATM0UNF
28.WD4AXJUT2IOOK2ABU
29.OK1GMKR2J8P4B
30.WB5STUW4VQPA3ARM

DX Callsigns 91-120
31.LA4GHAHK3PXAK7UM
32.W5PBK7ZCW3MNE
33.KT9WHB8EBYJA3KGC
34.JF1EVCO2PHA35DL
35.JA7AGODL5BAWUA3LPM
36.K5CDADN1GBJA1LNZ
37.N3KCJJA2UDUDL3HSF
38.4L1DARN4WAK3ZJ
39.ND6SWB9AYWKD3RF
40.AG9SSP0PZKSP2IU

DX Callsigns 121-150
41.4S7NEM3HVCI1MQ
42.DF1VMON6EFYB5ZAP
43.KU4VEW7LEBIZ1BII
44.KG4FSNW4WXKD5WUN
45.VE5RIOM3WMW1CC
46.SQ8JCMF5SGIUT5HP
47.W1TRCRA1QADL0AUE
48.YU7MUKH6FTSV8CKM
49.K2RSKG4VZVLZ1MR
50.UA3WWON4CAXGI4AAM


You may find it easier to download and print a PDF of the USA tables below.

USA Callsigns 1-30
1.WB3ACCK6RIYKD7WEA
2.KB0WGOKB4TEFKA5CVM
3.N4CMGAH6FPKM6PLP
4.KE6DJUKN4BNAK0VIE
5.KG1BAHKB3SOZK4HVR
6.KA1JWVKB9OCGN6XPT
7.KB9NLLKB9ENGN7WBB
8.KC2TVAWB7SGWKJ6AFQ
9.KC9PDUKG6VCLKK4DXL
10.WA2WFKKB4HPWKA3ZNR

USA Callsigns 31-60
11.N0FNZKG7GLIAI4CP
12.KB6RKXKD0GCTKG7WCU
13.KE7LWSKE0NFSKB6QJD
14.KG5NHDKB7GNQW4RHT
15.N3UBIK3KIDKD5AGC
16.KC2LBXN8OHHKB5QOF
17.KB5QDSKM4MFNKF4PCQ
18.KD7FCAKD9LAOKB1PND
19.K4BMPKK4ABYKD0JEX
20.KJ4MZKKF4WEWW5AEN

USA Callsigns 61-90
21.KC8SINKB2BEAAJ4TY
22.N0WSMKC9QQUK6GMA
23.W2UGKA5TNGKV7M
24.KC9QNQWP4KLFKC2PMD
25.WB1EWDKE4MHMKB7WWP
26.WD5BTXK5LOUN4CSX
27.KJ4JFJKF6JCEN4ADV
28.KD2DRSKG5IUMWB0SKW
29.KB5HNYKI4FKJKI6GWK
30.KB5DPRWD8ONIKM6CJT

USA Callsigns 91-120
31.KD0PAYKN6CATKC8PIV
32.KC9ARDKI6TWWKA4UBI
33.KC2CGXW7SZKG6SUY
34.WT8NW3GZVKC3MLU
35.N0BQKK4SRJWD4KTR
36.KG4YPJW6FLEK9PGD
37.KE4ZZSKL7HKUN0GIH
38.KN4NEFKB2DNIKK6TWA
39.AB3TEAB0CLKE0ITD
40.KD0EJPW9TXNNP4LM

USA Callsigns 121-150
41.KC8BTBN7VKZKJ4RCW
42.KD8TNXNE4TNKI7WUH
43.KD8UBNKD8VERKD4SBB
44.KG4LKWK7RMJKA2DHV
45.KB7HRRN1BZLKA5TDQ
46.KI7BRCW9RQXKC5EAM
47.KI4ELFKE6GNTN3UDX
48.W1BIMN9ZGGKE5PNF
49.KB8LXYN3LYTKN4PPX
50.KE0GIYKG6CCTN4WNZ